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Computing & online safety

Online safety

 

 

Early use of digital technology has been shown to improve language skills and promote children’s social development and creativity. But it’s not without risks for young children, who may come across inappropriate content or begin to copy what older children do online. The video guide above may be helpful to parents and carers.

Online safety checklist for young children (6-10)

Agree boundaries

Be clear what your child can and can’t do online – where they can use the internet, how much time they can spend online, the sites they can visit and the type of information they can share. Agree with your child when they can have a mobile phone or tablet.

Explore together

The best way to find out what your child is doing online is to ask them to tell you about what they do and what sites they like to visit. If they’re happy to, ask them to show you. Talk to them about being a good friend online.

Put yourself in control

Install parental controls on your home broadband and any internet-enabled devices. Set up a user account for your child on the main device they use and make sure other accounts in the household are password-protected so that younger children can’t access them by accident.

Use airplane mode

Use airplane mode on your devices when your child is using them so they can’t make any unapproved purchases or interact with anyone online without your knowledge.

Stay involved

Encourage them to use their tech devices in a communal area like the lounge or kitchen so you can keep an eye on how they’re using the internet and also share in their enjoyment.

Talk to siblings

It’s also a good idea to talk to any older children about what they’re doing online and what they show to younger children. Encourage them to be responsible and help keep their younger siblings safe.

Search safely

Use safe search engines such as Swiggle or Kids-search. You can save time by adding these to your ‘Favourites’. Safe search settings can also be activated on Google and other search engines, as well as YouTube.

Check if it’s suitable

The age ratings that come with games, apps, films and social networks are a good guide to whether they’re suitable for your child. For example, the minimum age limit is 13 for several social networking sites, including Facebook and Instagram. Although sites aimed at under-10s like Moshi Monsters and Club Penguin also have social networking elements.

 

Year 1 & 2

As well as e-safety education, children in Year 1 & 2 learn the basics of computer programming, also known as ‘coding’. This is generally taught using mobile device games-based software such as Tynker and Kodable, as well as the subscription-based Espresso coding. The software options are evolving quickly but the key thing is that children are learning to program while playing problem-solving games. 

Children in Year 1& 2 will also learn how to edit photos and videos, use datalogging equipment to study the weather and program ‘beebots’! Later in the year, they will be introduced to animation and music technology.

Year 3 & 4

As well as e-safety education, children in Year 3 &4  will learn the basics of computer programming, also known as ‘coding’. This is generally taught using the subscription-based Purple Mash coding. Children in Year 3 & 4 will also learn how to create, edit and publish photos and videos with an increasing level of sophistication. In the spring term, they will use data-logging equipment in relation to science investigation and/or geography fieldwork.  

We also aim to have special bi-annual computing focus. Previously, this has included Lego robotics lessons and 'the animation oscars' competition.

Year 5 & 6

As well as e-safety education, children in Year 5 & 6  will develop their understanding of computer programming, also known as ‘coding’. This is generally taught using the subscription-based Purple Mash coding, along with  programs like Scratch and Logo. We also run a code-club for Y5 & 6  and children have the opportunity to work on projects in class, as well as act as ‘technology leaders’, helping other children to program successfully.

Children in Year 5 & 6 will also learn how to create, edit and publish photos and videos with an increasing level of sophistication. In the spring term, they will use datalogging equipment in relation to science investigation and/or geography fieldwork. Later in the year, they will be introduced to animation. Children also use music technology throughout the year to create and evaluate their own compositions.

We also aim to have special bi-annual computing focus. Previously, this has included Lego robotics lessons and 'the animation oscars' competition.

Computing & online safety